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Free Motion Quilting

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Free Motion Quilting. Get inspired and try out new things.

Free Motion Quilting with Freezer Paper

Use freezer paper to easily mark areas you want to leave unquilted or transfer motifs onto your project. Quilting expert, Ashley Hough, shows you how.

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Free Motion Quilting, Beginner Tutorial 1 (of 4)

A four-part beginner level tutorial on free motion machine quilting, using a home domestic sewing machine.

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Free-Motion Quilting Tutorial

Join us in the Free Motion Quilting Series and learn fun and easy techniques to practice your quilting skills.

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DIY Free Motion Quilting Practice Tool

I've been looking for some kind of practice tool or device to improve my free motion skills, but couldn't find what I was looking for. For sit-down quilting, the kind you do on a home sewing machine or a sit-down longarm, it is the fabric that moves and the needle is stationary. As opposed to stand-up quilting on a long-arm, the fabric is stationary on the quit frame, and you move the needle over the fabric to do the quilting. Sit-down quilting is a different type of skill to master. My DIY free motion quilting tool. Although, I could not find something for sale retail, I did find a home-made device on a blog post at Mary's Quilting Notes. Mary even has a short video for her device on YouTube. This is exactly the type of device I was looking for. Something to hold a pen steady while you move a practice sheet underneath. I went straight to the plumbing/pipes aisle at Home Depot and picked up the pieces I needed. I didn't want to do any measuring, cutting or filing, so mine is just slightly different than Mary's - but even easier too. 😉 Can't remember exact cost, but it isn't much. Think the total was less than $10. No special tools required except your sewing machine's screwdriver to open and close the clamps. Parts for the quilting tool. Pen-holder parts SUPPLIES NEEDED: 1 inch x 2 ft PVC pipe (2) 1 inch 90-degree PVC elbow (2) 1 inch PVC Tee (2) 3/4 inch PVC coupling hose clamp to fit a 1" PVC pipe hose clamp to fit hose adapter 3/4" hose connector (blue piece in photo above) a 3-ring binder with clear plastic insertable-cover (I used an old one I had on-hand) dry-erase marker rubberbands DIRECTIONS: The parts fit together easily. No cutting or filing necessary. Only tool needed is a flat head screwdriver for the hose clamps. Slide the larger hose clamp onto the 1" PVC pipe. Open the smaller hose clamp and loop it through the larger hose clamp. Center clamp on the pipe. Insert the hose connector into the small hose clamp. Use a screwdriver to tighten clamps over the center of the pipe. Pen-holder assembly. Fit each 3/4" coupling into the top of a Tee Bottom pieces of device Fit this piece into each elbow piece. May have to push a little bit for a snug fit. Fit these end pieces into the 2-foot PVC pipe. The end of the device. Cut the spine from the binder. You should have two flat clear plastic-covered panels to use as work boards. Place a work board under the quilting tool. Wrap a rubber band (or two) around the end of a dry-erase marker and drop it into the pen holder. Rubber band-covered marker. Drop the marker into the pen holder and push down until it reaches the work board. You're done! Move the board to Practice Away! The dry-erase marker easily wipes off with a tissue to practice again. Put a copy of your favorite quilting design under the clear cover and practice tracing as well. Tracing a quilting practice sheet. Just wipe off the cover and do it again. A short little demonstration video: I am sharing this post on FreeMotion Linky Tuesday, Fiber Tuesday, Kathy's Quilts Slow Sunday Stitching, Show Off Saturday, and What a Hoot Quilts!. Happy Stitching!

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Learn How to Free Motion Quilt Stippling or Meandering

Learn how to machine quilt Stippling, one of the most popular free motion quilting designs, and typically the first design any beginner learns to machine quilt. Watch as Leah Day demonstrates how to quilt Stippling on a home machine on a baby quilt. Also learn how to quilt Stippling on a longarm quilting frame.

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The Absolute Best Way to Practice Free-Motion Quilting

Almost every month I travel and teach free-motion quilting to quilters at guilds and quilt shops. I truly love it, and I hope that everyone who takes a class from me enjoys it as well! But, inevitably, there comes a time in every class where I have to break the bad news . . . to get better at machine quilting, you have to practice. I know, I know. It’s not exactly what you (or anyone for that matter) wants to hear. I so wish that I had that one tip, trick, or even funny joke that would instantly make you a great machine quilter . . . But, unfortunately, I don't. But before you leave in frustration . . . there is hope! While you do have to practice, I have the absolute best way to practice machine quilting. It’s a technique from my soon to be released book, Free-Motion Meandering: A Beginner’s Guide to Machine Quilting. I developed this practice technique from teaching more machine quilting classes than I can count. It makes learning machine quilting manageable and helps prepare you for working on an actual quilt. The bottom line is that if you practice productively, you will get better at machine quilting faster. On a side note, this technique works whether you are drawing the quilting design or actually quilting on a quilt sandwich. How to Practice Machine Quilting 1. Define a practice area. Define a practice area by quilting (or drawing) a square. It doesn’t have to be any particular size or even a square. You just need clear boundaries to fill in with quilting. It could be a whole piece of paper or an area that you have marked on a quilt or even an actual quilt block. (You get bonus points for practicing on an actual quilt.) 2. Commit to Filling in the Whole Area Pick out a quilting design and commit to filling in the whole area without stopping or ripping out quilting (or erasing any drawn lines). But that’s not all . . . here comes the hardest part of all . . . you can’t judge your quilting while you’re doing it. (I told you it would be difficult!) That also means you can't say negative things to yourself. (It's amazing that we will say things to ourselves that we wouldn't allow any one else to say!!) 3. Ready . . . Set . . . Quilt! This is where the fun happens! Start quilting (or drawing) a design in the area, trying to fill it in as much as possible. The design you use doesn’t matter. It could be something that you have been wanting to master or perhaps a design you plan on using on your next quilt. If you can’t decide, you could always quilt “Angela Is Awesome” over and over again. Just kidding! 4. Assess Your Quilting Once finished, look over your sample and decide on one thing you want to improve during your next practice session. It could be anything, including, but not limited to: • Quilting smoother lines • Keeping the stitch length consistent • Avoiding getting stuck • Not cursing as much while quilting (Hey, it doesn’t matter what your goal is!) If you are a perfectionist, it may be difficult limiting yourself to only one thing. But it’s very, very important to only focus on one aspect of your quilting to improve. Setting just one goal gives you the ability to see improvement. When it comes to machine quilting, achieving small goals can help prevent you from giving up! 5. Repeat Now that you have a goal in mind, repeat the steps and practice until you are ready to start working on a different goal. It isn’t really about how long you practice, it’s about consistency. Try doing quilting five minutes a day . . . or twenty minutes a week . . . whatever you think is manageable for you! What if you make a quilting “mistake”? Here's the kicker, what happens if you make a mistake. Well, I would argue that it's not "if" you make a mistake, it's what you do "when" you make a mistake! Filling in a defined area teaches so much more than just learning a particular quilting design. You’ll learn how to maneuver around an area as well as how to deal with corners. But most importantly, it will help you see what the overall quilting texture will look like. When your face is just a couple of inches away from the quilt, it can be so easy to spot all your mistakes. But when the whole area is filled, you'll see that the overall texture can hide any imperfections. For instance, if I make a mistake (or, as I prefer to call it, “an unintentional customization”) it’s going to be very obvious . . . such as this "oops" I quilted on this sample. But after filling in the whole area, you'll notice that it starts to blend in with rest of the quilting. The moral of this story is, if you make a mistake . . . just keep quilting until you can’t see it anymore. (Don’t you wish that was the case with other things in life?!?) I already mentioned that this is in my newest book, Free-Motion Meandering, but I have to tell you that I couldn’t be more proud of it! This book is the product of all the classes I have taught. It not only shows you several versatile meandering designs including swirls, leaves, and even improv quilting, it also includes frequently asked questions, as well as how to troubleshoot common mistakes. The book will be released in the next week or two, but you can preorder a signed copy now. Thanks so much for your support! Happy quilting! Angela Walters Follow my blog with Bloglovin

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My secret for EASY free motion quilting - Geta's Quilting Studio

The thing that helps me most in my free motion quilting journey is this: I don’t quilt with both hands on top of the quilt sandwich. I tried it in my first days of quilting and I hated it. I wanted to free motion quilt and I wanted to make it easy and fun so […]

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Quilting Circles by Leonie West

Quilt Circles on your Domestic Sewing Machine easily.Westalee Design Circles on Quilts templates for Domestic and Longarm Machines. Leonie West gives a tutor...

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