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Middle School Reading

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Middle School Reading. Get inspired and try out new things.

Point of View Teaching Activities and Ideas

Find powerful point of view teaching activities and ideas including strong books and anchor charts to strengthen students' understanding.

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Teach Inferencing with Short Films

Teach EVERY reading literature and reading informational text common core state standard using inspirational and engaging short films and video clips! For an entire year of highly engaging, no prep…

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Using Sentence Frames to Write Reading Responses

In upper grade classrooms, students spend a great deal of time responding to the texts they read. Over the years I have found that no matter what grade level I teach, students have a difficult time writing thorough and meaningful reading responses. At the start of every year my students need quite a bit of guidance when writing their responses. One of the best ways that I have found to teach students to write meaningful responses is by providing them with sentence frames. I like to encourage students to follow three simple steps when writing reading responses, each with sentence frames and prompts to use: Step 1: What did you read? While reading... In chapter __ of... On page __ of... During today's reading of... Step 2: What happened in the text? Tell what a character said. Tell what a character did. Tell what a character thought, felt, or learned. Describe the setting. Describe an important event that occurred. Explain a problem that was encountered. Step 3: What did you think? This made me think... This made me realize... Based on this, I can infer... Based on this, I can predict... This reminded me of... I can relate to this because... I could visualize... I now understand... This three-step process encourages students to not only tell what happened in a text, but also reflect on what they thought or felt about what they read. Here is a sample response using these steps: I have included a FREE handout for you to share with your students to help guide them in writing thorough and meaningful reading responses. Click HERE download this FREEBIE. If you are looking for more resources for reading response, check out my Reading Response Journals for literature and non-fiction texts. These resources include anchor charts for different reading strategies and skills, as well as more specific sentence frames for the different skills. Click on the pics to learn more. Writing thoughtful reading responses is not always easy, but with a bit of guidance from using sentence frames and prompts, it will soon become second nature for students!!

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Annotating Tips for Close Reading - Teaching with Jennifer Findley

Annotating texts is a powerful strategy for readers. Get tips and strategies to help your students annotate effectively and use their annotations.

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Classroom Organization in Middle School and Upper Elementary | Small Group| Part 7

Doing guided reading and small group in upper elementary and middle school ELA classrooms is easy to implement with my tips and tricks.

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Offering Choice in your Reading Response Activities - Top Teaching Tasks

Reading Response activities will likely form a major part of your reading programme, whether you are running guided reading groups, a daily 5 system,

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3 ways to make student thinking visible

Help the learning process with these simple strategies for making studennt thinking visible. Perfect for middle and high school English classes.

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Thinking about Non-Fiction Choice Board

With the CCSS emphasizing non-fiction text, this choice board is a perfect way to engage students. This choice board focuses on student thinking, and works well with collaborative groups. Students choose 3 activities to complete making a tic-tac-toe, and then cut out the corresponding cards to glue...

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