Potnia Theron

Collection by Jair Ríos

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Jair Ríos
EARLY NEOLITHIC - Seated Mother Goddess, c. 6500.  Çatal Höyük, Turkey.

mypaganpath

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Goddess Holding Animals Italic 500-400 BCE Amber  Etruscan

Goddess Holding Animals Italic 500-400 BCE Amber

Photographed at the Getty Villa in Malibu, California.

Potnia Theron (Mistress of animals)

Chieti, Museo della Civitella, antefix from the façade of Temple B, Civitella di Teate, ceramic.

#Potnia #Theron Mistress of animals  #Minoan #goddess  #Chieti Museo della Civitella

Potnia Theron (Mistress of animals)

Chieti, Museo della Civitella, antefix from the façade of Temple B, Civitella di Teate, ceramic.

The Woman Who   Dances with Tigers:  Indus Valley Seals

Dances with Tigers and other Females

This dancing goddess from 3300 years ago is probably the ancient Greek goddess Demeter, or, as the Romans renamed her, Ceres, the source of our word cereal. She is from Ugarit, ancient Phoenecia, ancestral Canaan. She is the goddess of the grain and was believed to have given the gift of agriculture to us. She dances here bare-breasted, holding two sheaves of grain and with her animals on either side.

Glad Midsummer!

This dancing goddess or priestess. Origin unclear, Nimrod, Ugarit, or ancient Phoenecia, She dances here bare-breasted, holding two sheaves of grain, flanked by goat like animals. Ivory box lid.

Glad Midsummer!

Anahita is the name of a popular Zoroastrian yazatā and an ancient Iranian cosmological figure venerated as the female guardian angel of waters (Ābān), associated with fertility, healing and wisdom.

Anahita; The Deity of Water, Fertility, Healing and Wisdom

Anahita is the name of a popular Zoroastrian yazata and an ancient Iranian cosmological figure venerated as the female guardian angel of waters (Aban), associated with fertility, healing and wisdom. Her name is (Avestan) Ard?wi Sura Anahita, (Old-Persian) Anahita, (Middle-Persian) Ardwisur Anahid (New-Persian) Nahid. In Armenia she is called Anahit and Greeco-Roman historians refer to her either as Anaitis or identified her with one of the divinities from their own pantheons.

Bastet    Bastet was the cat-goddess of Bubastis in the Eastern Delta. She was probably worshipped originally as a wild cat (Felis vercata maniculata), but her later manifestations were as the domestic cat that was introduced into Egypt around 2100 BC.    She was depicted as a woman with a cat's head, or in the form that is familiar to us from the numerous Late-Period statues of her, that of a lissom and majestic queen cat.    Although a virgin goddess she was nevertheless the mother of a…

History - Ancient History in depth: Ancient Egyptian Gods Gallery

Barbara Waterson explores a pantheon of gods, demons, genies, and animals.

Luristan Bronze | Early Iron Age, ca. 1250 to 700 BCE.

Luristan Bronzes at the LACMA

Perusing the online exhibits of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, I was awed by their amazing collection of Luristan bronzes. These objects were made during the early Iron Age, ca. 1250 to 700 BCE, in the Luristan district of west-central Iran. In the 1920s and 1930s several enormous cemeteries in this region were looted, and these fascinating objects flooded onto the world antiquities market. This explains how they ended up in the LACMA; as I said before about their collection of…

Gold and enamel pendant with Mistress of Animals. Period: Archaic. Date: 7th century B.C. Culture: Greek.

Gold and enamel pendant with Mistress of Animals. Period: Archaic. Date: 7th century B.C. Culture: Greek.

Bone fibula catch-plate, 660 BCE, of the goddess Orthia, a local Peloponnesian goddess whose worship pre-dated the Olympians. Possibly connected to the religion of the Minoans, she was later combined with the Olympian, Artemis, and the rituals surrounding her worship became fodder for Roman tourists during the Flavian period.

Bone fibula catch-plate, 660 BCE, of the goddess Orthia, a local Peloponnesian goddess whose worship pre-dated the Olympians. Possibly connected to the religion of the Minoans, she was later combined with the Olympian, Artemis, and the rituals surrounding her worship became fodder for Roman tourists during the Flavian period.

Syrian goddess surrounded by rampant goats  in ivory  Notice similarities with next pin of Mycenaen origin.

Mycenaean Frescos

Horse Frontlet (face shield)    Neo-Assyrian, 9th-8th century BC

OMG that Artifact!

Horse Frontlet Neo-Assyrian, 9th-8th century BC The Metropolitan Museum of Art