Tudor history

Collection by Margaret Ann Garmon

922 
Pins
 • 
292 
Followers
Margaret Ann Garmon
House of Tudor 1485 - 1603 family tree

Royal House of Tudor

The Royal House of Tudor created the Golden Age of England. Search this pre British royal family tree for detailed descriptions of it's royal members

Edward VI, the last Tudor King...I've never seen this portrait!.

Edward VI, the last Tudor King...I've never seen this portrait!.

Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset, was the son of King Henry VIII of England and his teenage mistress, Elizabeth (Bessie) Blount. He was the only illegitimate offspring whom Henry acknowledged. He was born in 1519, and married Lady Mary Howard at the age of 14. He died childless in 1536 when he was just 17.

Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset, was the son of King Henry VIII of England and his teenage mistress, Elizabeth (Bessie) Blount. He was the only illegitimate offspring whom Henry acknowledged. He was born in 1519, and married Lady Mary Howard at the age of 14. He died childless in 1536 when he was just 17.

A Tudor Pomander or Musk Ball.  Because of the bad scents which accompanied Tudor England settings, MUSK BALLS were part their lives.  Usually, an orange was placed inside the BALL to freshen the air with pleasant scents.  I suppose it is like our scent candles today.  Amazing 16th century object from the Queen’s collection at Windsor Castle, the Round Tower.  It probably was in the collection of Queen Elizabeth I.  It was found in the River Thames at Windsor.

londonconnection.com

This domain may be for sale!

Queen Elizabeth I was a user of ceruse, a mixture of white lead and vinegar that was applied to the face to make the skin appear paler. It is widely believed the queen died of blood poisoning at the age of 70 in 1603, possibly caused by the noxious 'Mask of Youth'.

Vanity mirror used by tragic 18th century society beauty, 27, who died of make-up poisoning sells for £300,000

Maria Gunning had been the 18th century equivalent of Angelina Jolie; a celebrity who caused men to faint in awe of her beauty. But it was her beauty regime with lead-based make-up that led to her nasty demise.

'Henry VIII.'s largest residence barely exists today. The Palace at Whitehall was once the largest building in the world, containing an extraordinary 1,500 rooms. Today, just the Banqueting House - built some 70 years after Henry's death-remains.'

Henry VIII's palaces

“You should begin with Greenwich, and if you can, arrive by water,” says Dr David Starkey The son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York was born in

Henry VIII's dagger, which is stored in the Leeds Armouries has a Tudor rose and Katherine's pomegranate emblem engraved on the blade.

Henry VIII's dagger, which is stored in the Leeds Armouries has a Tudor rose and Katherine's pomegranate emblem engraved on the blade.

A rare Tudor portrait of Margaret Beaufort, the formidable grandmother of Henry VIII, has been unveiled by the historian David Starkey at Hever Castle in Kent

Portrait of Margaret Beaufort, mother and grandmother of kings, is unveiled

Historian David Starkey shows painting of 'the most powerful woman in Tudor England' at Hever Castle

Who is the lady revealed in this x-ray image of a portrait of Elizabeth I in the National Portrait Gallery?

Who is the lady revealed in this x-ray image of a portrait of Elizabeth I in the National Portrait Gallery?

The Tudor Cosmo Girl

I shared this on my Facebook page this morning, but I thought those of you who don’t “do” Facebook might enjoy it:

The Prince Tudor theory (also known as Tudor Rose theory) is a variant of the Oxfordian theory of Shakespeare authorship, which asserts that Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford was the true author of the works published under the name of William Shakespeare. The Prince Tudor variant holds that Oxford and Queen Elizabeth I were lovers and had a child who was raised as Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton. The theory followed earlier arguments that Francis Bacon was a son of the queen.

The Prince Tudor theory (also known as Tudor Rose theory) is a variant of the Oxfordian theory of Shakespeare authorship, which asserts that Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford was the true author of the works published under the name of William Shakespeare. The Prince Tudor variant holds that Oxford and Queen Elizabeth I were lovers and had a child who was raised as Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton. The theory followed earlier arguments that Francis Bacon was a son of the queen.

Queen Elizabeth's coronation gown was decorated with pale pink Tudor roses (England); pale green leeks (Wales); green and silver shamrocks (Ireland); pale purple and amethyst thistles (Scotland); green and gold maple leaves (Canada); mimosa yellow wattle flowers (Australia); silver and green ferns (New Zealand); pink and silver proteas (South Africa) ; golden wheat (Pakistan) and mother of pearl and opal lotus flowers (India and Ceylon).

Hampton Court Palace. One of King Henry VIII palaces.

Hampton Court Palace. One of King Henry VIII palaces.